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Distance Between Jobs and Homes Growing in Most Metro Areas


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Jobs are getting farther away from where people live, according to a new analysis of demographic and employment data by the Brookings Institution.

The number of jobs within a typical commute distance for residents of the nation’s 96 largest metro areas fell by 7% between 2000 and 2012, Brookings found.  That’s not true for all metro areas – in 29 metro areas, including Raleigh, NC, and Florida’s Space Coast, there were more jobs in 2012 within the typical commute distance.

30 metro areas experienced net job losses, but 37 metro that experienced overall employment growth saw an increase in the distance between jobs and residents.  In Phoenix, for example, employment grew by nearly 11% from 2000 to 2012, but the number of jobs that were near to where people lived fell by nearly 17%.

Because metro areas vary widely in size, transportation infrastructure and development patterns, the typical commute distance varies widely.  In Atlanta, GA, for example, it’s 2.8 miles, while in Stockton, CA, it’s 4.7 miles.

Despite job growth in suburbs, suburban residents found themselves farther away from employment opportunities than city residents, the analysis found.  Nearly 60 million suburban residents live in neighborhoods with declining proximity to jobs, compared with around 33 million city residents.

Check out the newest link at HAR.com to find your home and its proximity to your job.

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